City Lab | The Tech Helping Immigrants Hack the Ban

City Lab | The Tech Helping Immigrants Hack the Ban

Linda Poon for City Lab

Across the country, designers and coders are coming together to develop tools for communities targeted by Trump’s orders. 

Tech firms are increasingly dipping their toes into politics since President Donald Trump took office. For one thing, they’ve been among the most vocal opposition to his immigration orders. When he floated the idea of a Muslim registry in December, more than a thousand tech employees signed a pledgenot to take part in creating it. Then when he initiated his temporary travel ban on seven Muslim-majority countries in January, companies from Apple to Netflix to Microsoft filed a legal brief arguing that the ban posed “significant harm” to businesses.

Vocativ | Advocates, Lawyers Head Back To Airports In Wake Of New Travel Ban

Vocativ | Advocates, Lawyers Head Back To Airports In Wake Of New Travel Ban

Another web project created during an NYC “Hack The Ban” hackathon is similarly well underway. Called “Border Buddy,” the soon-to-be-released mobile app allows travelers concerned about getting held up by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to “check in” prior to their flight, stating their estimated arrival time. This way, if the user fails to check in again upon exiting the airport, a volunteer lawyer will be contacted on their behalf

Vocativ | Meet The Coders Working To Hack Trump’s Immigration Ban

Vocativ | Meet The Coders Working To Hack Trump’s Immigration Ban

After President Trump announced his ban on travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries, protesters and lawyers rushed to major airports to help those detained. Soon there may be an app for that. For 12-hours on a Saturday, more than 60 developers, programmers, designers, and other tech-savvy creatives gathered in Brooklyn to “hack the ban,” under the advisement of immigration experts.

 

Hack the Ban: NYC Community Design Solutions to Combat Immigration Order

Hack the Ban: NYC Community Design Solutions to Combat Immigration Order

Educators, nonprofits, lawyers, students and technologists gathered at New York University’s engineering and design school on Saturday for a civics-oriented hackathon. Working with nonprofit organizations like CUNY CLEAR and the Center For Constitutional Rights, the teams developed apps, synthesized data, and designed graphics to support the organizations’ efforts educating immigrants and protecting minority rights in an event titled, “Hack the Ban.”

Brooklyn Daily Eagle | Techies ‘Hack the Ban’ for undocumented immigrants in Brooklyn

Brooklyn Daily Eagle | Techies ‘Hack the Ban’ for undocumented immigrants in Brooklyn

By Mary FrostBrooklyn Daily Eagle

As home to thousands of immigrants and an increasing number of technology professionals and creatives, it was only a matter of time before the groups got together in Brooklyn.

On Saturday, tech and media pros came to the aid of groups representing undocumented immigrants at an all-day hackathon held at NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering at MetroTech.

ABA Journal | Trump immigration policies draw rapid legal-tech response

ABA Journal | Trump immigration policies draw rapid legal-tech response

December, as Donald Trump’s presidential inauguration approached, a friend and former boss gave New York resident Leslie Martinez an intriguing offer.
Martinez’s friend Justin Hendrix was meeting with CUNY Clear, a project by City University of New York School of Law to help Muslim, Arab, South Asian and other communities in New York City with their unmet legal needs. Martinez was eager to help in any way she could, and became part of the wave of citizen action that followed Trump’s election.